1. Entertainment
Send to a Friend via Email
Dave White

The story of Ten Years After

By August 23, 2013

Follow me on:

With three albums already released and a long list of live concert performances logged, Ten Years After were already making a name for themselves when they took the stage at Woodstock in August 1969. The inclusion of their performance of "I'm Going Home" in the Woodstock film and soundtrack album out them over the top, where they stayed for five years after.

The TYA story begins in 1960, with formation of a teenaged band in Nottinghamshire, England. It continues through a career-changing performance at Woodstock in 1969, and it continues through today.

Read the story of Ten Years After

Album cover image courtesy UME Imports

Comments

February 1, 2014 at 3:05 pm
(1) David says:

I came to this page to read up on Ten Years After, a very solid rock band. When I got to this page I see almost nothing, except a link to read up on Ten Years After. Why am I guided to a page that has absolutely nothing on the subject matter I’m after. Instead I am guided to a different page where I just might find something about what I’m looking for.

Am I the only one that is tired of About.com habit of showing as little as possible per page, thus forcing you into viewing many more pages (think ads). Now I have no problem with a business trying to pay their dues, but SIX LINES about a group just to send you else where is something I have grown tired of.

I have commented to About.Com about this before, and never heard a thing. I can no longer come to these pages, even though I like the content very much, I can’t waste my time clicking through page after page so they can make more money.

Keep up the good work, About.Com I wish you the best. But it won’t be including me anymore.

David

February 2, 2014 at 7:10 am
(2) Dave White says:

David, thanks for your feedback. I know how frustrating it can be when something like this happens. The only time a link should direct you to a blog post is when the content contained is in the post itself, which clearly was not the case here. Otherwise, all of the possible links over which I have control (weekly newsletter, Facebook, Twitter, Google+) go directly to the article, not to the blog post promoting it. Sometimes others will link to About.com Classic Rock content, and sometimes link to the blog rather than the article. Not knowing where you lined from, I don’t know if that was the case here. I really do appreciate your input. The only way we can hope to deliver what our readers want is to listen when they tell us.
Dave

Leave a Comment


Line and paragraph breaks are automatic. Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title="">, <b>, <i>, <strike>

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.